The A Rocha Blog

Rev. Stan LeQuire is the director of the Ecotourism Project which is supported by the School of Leadership and Development at Eastern University, PA, USA. The project, launched in 2003, identifies and partners with faith-based ecotourism projects. In 2010, Stan was honored by an invitation to lecture on ecotourism to university students and government officials in the Sichuan Province of China. He teaches sustainable development and is the author of two books, The Best Preaching on Earth (1996) and Wild and Wonderful: Tourism, Faith and Communities (2014).

15th January 2015 | Tom Rowley | 1 comments

Hopey New Year

The “reality” of the situation is grim. But, like a figure-ground image, what we first see isn’t all there is. Viewed with human eyes, the challenges facing the planet look insurmountable. The eyes of faith, however, see a different picture; they see more.

Categories: Reflections
31st October 2014 | Dave Bookless | 2 comments

Jonah: Save the Whale!

The book of Jonah is short and contains just one story. It’s usually interpreted as reminding us we can’t run away from God, and as showing the Gospel as good news of God’s desire to forgive the sin of people who genuinely turn to him. All this is clearly there, but there’s more to Jonah and to the Gospel than this suggests.

Categories: Reflections
16th October 2014 | Ben Lowe | 0 comments

How do we define success?

There’s a strong undercurrent of discouragement and despair in the conservation community. Given the challenges we’re up against, it’s hardly surprising. Needs can be overwhelming—how can we possibly fix them all? Expectations can be just as numerous and challenging—how can we possibly please everyone?

Categories: Questions
15th September 2014 | Panu Pihkala | 0 comments

Places of knowing God and nature

We live in a world where places are less valued than in earlier times. Technology and urbanization lead us away from being connected to places. As bodily creatures, we need bodily connections to places. And nature needs humans who are place-oriented, because such humans take an effort to care for places.

Categories: Reflections
31st August 2014 | Dave Bookless | 2 comments

Jeremiah – A bird’s eye view of the Middle East

Today’s Middle East is beset by tragedy: a litany of human suffering, migration and exile in a region of such beauty and cultural richness. Yet, the Middle East is also one of the great wildlife migration routes: millions of birds take this route to and fro each year. What insights can we gain from linking these two mass migrations, one human, sudden and involuntary, the other avian, regular and instinctive?