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Soohwan, a native of South Korea, has spent over two decades of her life outside Korea: Bangladesh, Thailand, Canada and Israel. She worked among the poorest of the poor, and directed multi-cultural training programs, global human resources, and consulting projects concerning leadership in Christian nonprofit organizations before responding the call to go to Fukushima, Japan in March 2011. After forming a consortium of international Christian NGOs and local churches in Fukushima to create holistic disaster response to the unprecedented triple disaster (earthquake, tsunami, and ongoing nuclear crises), Soohwan continued the relationship with churches in Fukushima. In 2015 she founded Global Learning Consortium to create effective partnerships ‘bathed in prayer’ among local churches, Christian organizations and academic institutions for long-term sustainable impact in post-disaster Fukushima. She facilitates prayer retreats, writes, lectures and speaks at conferences on social justice and spiritual formation. Her primary focus these days is to reflect deeply on how to shape single-mindedness out of single-heartedness against multi-tasking, overachieving, anxiety-driven lifestyles. She obtained a BA in Education at Ewha Womans University in Seoul, Korea and a Master of Christian Studies at Regent College in Vancouver, Canada. Soohwan and her husband, Jonathan Wilson, live in Vancouver where they are part of a vibrant local congregation.

21st December 2017 | Robert Sluka | 0 comments

Peace on Earth, Goodwill to Manatees

Advent and Christmas remind us that the Christ-child came to bring peace. We remember that we need peace with God, and we remember that we need peace with our neighbor. But does Christ’s birth have anything to do with bringing peace between us and animals – does the advent mean goodwill to manatees?

Categories: Reflections
4th December 2017 | Dave Bookless | 2 comments

Should we save endangered species?

Biology professor R. Alexander Pyron argues that ‘The only reason we should conserve biodiversity is for ourselves, to create a stable future for human beings.’ At the heart of this is a belief that humanity is the sole species that matters, and possesses not only the creative technological capacity but also the moral will to solve all of its own problems. This is the neo-religious myth of human progress, rooted in neither science nor logic.

Categories: Questions
14th September 2017 | Robert Sluka | 4 comments

Waiting for Hurricane Irma

Our family has been living abroad for the past 21 years and relocated to Florida – the week before Hurricane Irma hit. In a way, bad timing. However, it was good to go through this experience living with family.

Categories: Stories
Tags: storms USA
31st August 2017 | Dave Bookless | 0 comments

A harvest for the world

With most of the population now living in cities, Harvest festivals can seem archaic and quaint. At its worst Harvest can simply be a longing for a mythical rural idyll that never really existed, yet I believe we need to celebrate Harvest today more than ever. Here’s why.

Categories: Reflections
Tags: agriculture