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Dr Paul Kariya is Executive Director of the Independent Power Producers Association of British Columbia, an industry association helping to develop the renewable energy sector in Western Canada. Paul continues at Trinity Western University, in Langley BC as an adjunct faculty member in the Master of Arts Leadership program. Prior to this, Paul was the Executive Director of Pacific Salmon Foundation (PSF), a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the protection, conservation and recovery of Pacific salmon based in Vancouver BC. Paul obtained an MA and PhD in Geography at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. Paul grew up on the West Coast of Vancouver Island as the son of a Japanese-Canadian salmon fisherman. Love of the ocean and for God’s creation comes from these beginnings. Paul is married and has 3 adult children.

15th August 2018 | Paul Kariya | 0 comments

A fisherman and A Rocha

This summer, after 10 years as an international trustee, I retired from the board of A Rocha. How is it that the son of an immigrant fisherman from Japan came to be involved with creation care?

Categories: Reflections
Tags: Canada fishing
31st July 2018 | Dave Bookless | 4 comments

Plastic theology

By ‘plastic theology’ I don’t mean theology that is cheap, disposable and tacky! I want to reflect on the spiritual power and importance of something that has only been around for a very short time yet has become all-pervasive and all of us have become dependent upon.

Categories: Reflections
30th June 2018 | Dave Bookless | 1 comments

Learning creation care in Oceania

Sometimes the Christian Gospel is described as a universal message that speaks to all cultures. I profoundly disagree! The Gospel is not a set of abstract philosophical concepts that are ‘culture free’ (as if such a thing were possible). Rather, it becomes Good News when it is grounded within the earthy realities of particular places […]

Categories: Reflections
31st May 2018 | Chris Naylor | 0 comments

Creation Care in Lebanon

History is written in the landscapes of the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon. Baalbek with its magnificent Roman ruins, more ancient rounded hills known as tells, and long rusted barbed wire and tank emplacements. For good or ill we leave our mark on the land long after we have gone. Can people tell what we believe about God from what we write in the landscape?

Categories: Reflections
15th April 2018 | Peter Harris | 2 comments

The thinning of life

Most places that we know around the world have witnessed what has been called a ‘thinning of life’. How anyone lives experiences like this will, of course, depend on what kind of person they are. Miranda and I have an arts training and background, and at times our response to these multiple losses has been emotional and quite personal.

Categories: Reflections
Tags: hope lament
21st December 2017 | Robert Sluka | 0 comments

Peace on Earth, Goodwill to Manatees

Advent and Christmas remind us that the Christ-child came to bring peace. We remember that we need peace with God, and we remember that we need peace with our neighbor. But does Christ’s birth have anything to do with bringing peace between us and animals – does the advent mean goodwill to manatees?

Categories: Reflections
4th December 2017 | Dave Bookless | 2 comments

Should we save endangered species?

Biology professor R. Alexander Pyron argues that ‘The only reason we should conserve biodiversity is for ourselves, to create a stable future for human beings.’ At the heart of this is a belief that humanity is the sole species that matters, and possesses not only the creative technological capacity but also the moral will to solve all of its own problems. This is the neo-religious myth of human progress, rooted in neither science nor logic.

Categories: Questions